• prep: 0 hr
  • cook: 0 hr
  • total: 0 hr
Print Save
  • servings:
  • Summary

    Store-bought yogurt may be convenient but it can't compare to the mild creaminess of homemade. The good news is that making yogurt is incredibly easy—as long as you keep your tools clean and don't jiggle the mixture while it's setting, it's almost foolproof. Plus, it's a fun science project for experimenters both young and old. Homemade yogurt requires very little special equipment. You can invest in a yogurt maker but there are many potential incubators you might already own, such as a thermos. Alternatively, you might use a covered container, set in a conventional oven (preferably with the light on), a microwave, a cooler (place jars of hot water inside to help maintain a warm environment), or a slow cooker (preheat the slow cooker but turn it off to incubate). Another option is to simply swaddle the covered container with a heating pad, blanket, or towel. And while yogurt requires at least five hours to incubate, there's only about 30 minutes of active time. You can even make the yogurt before going to bed and let it incubate overnight. For your first few batches, we recommend treating yourself to whole milk, because it produces a naturally thick final product. However, yogurt can be made with skim or low-fat milk—it just will probably be a bit thinner than store-bought varieties, which often contain thickeners. For more on making yogurt at home, see Megan O. Steintrager's complete primer, How to Make Yogurt.

    Ingredients

    • 4 cups (1 quart) milk
    • 3 tablespoons plain yogurt (purchased or homemade)* or powdered yogurt starter (amount specified on package)**
    • Flavorings such as jam, honey, dulce de leche, molasses, fresh or dried fruit, garlic, herbs, etc (optional)
    • *If using store-bought yogurt, choose a yogurt that tastes good to you. It's important to select an unsweetened version that contains live cultures, but the fat content doesn't matter.
    • **Powdered starters can be found at some grocery and health food stores and from online sources such as the New England Cheesemaking Supply Company. Read the package instructions to determine how much starter to use for a batch of yogurt—many come in small envelopes or packets perfectly sized to make a single batch.
    • Candy thermometer; yogurt maker or other incubator, such as a thermos; cheesecloth for straining (optional); Mason jars or other container for storage

    Instructions

    Click Here For Step-By-Step Instructions

    Video

    Tags

    Nutrition

    Nutritional Info
    • Servings Per Recipe: 4
    • Amount Per Serving
    • Calories: 273 % Daily Value *
    • Total Fat: 13 g 19.81%
    • Saturated Fat: 7 g 35.25%
    • Trans Fat: 0 g %
    • Cholesterol: 104 mg 34.58%
    • Sodium: 439 mg 18.28%
    • Calcium: 319 mg 31.93%
    • Potassium: 366 mg 10.46%
    • Magnesium: 0 mg 0%
    • Iron: 0 mg 0.39%
    • Zinc: 0 mg 0%
    • Total Carbohydrate: 22 g %
    • Dietary Fiber: 0 g 1%
    • Sugar: 14 g
    • Protein: 16 g
    • Alcohol: 0 g
    • Omega 3 Fatty Acid: 0 g
    • Omega 6 Fatty Acid: 0 g
    • Vitamin A 10.51%
    • Vitamin C 0.94%
    • Vitamin D 30.22%
    • * Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs.
    Diabetes Exchanges
    • Exchange - Fat2
    • Exchange - Fruit0
    • Exchange - NonFat Milk1
    • Exchange - Other Carbs0
    • Exchange - Starch1
    • Exchange - Vegetables0
    • Exchange - Lean Meat1
    • Exchange - Alcohol0
    MyPlate Info
    • MyPlate - Grain Total0 oz-eq
    • MyPlate - Vegetable Total0 c
    • MyPlate - Fruit0 c
    • MyPlate - Dairy1 c
    • MyPlate - Protein Total0 oz-eq

    OTHER RECIPES YOU MAY LIKE